Pig Out this Chinese New Year

Red+paper+cut+pig+zodiac+sign+isolate+on+white+background+vector+design+%28Chinese+word+mean+Good+Fortune%29
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Pig Out this Chinese New Year

Red paper cut pig zodiac sign isolate on white background vector design (Chinese word mean Good Fortune)

Red paper cut pig zodiac sign isolate on white background vector design (Chinese word mean Good Fortune)

Red paper cut pig zodiac sign isolate on white background vector design (Chinese word mean Good Fortune)

Red paper cut pig zodiac sign isolate on white background vector design (Chinese word mean Good Fortune)

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A new year has broken skin for the year of 2019, over half of the world’s population ringing in their resolutions and continuing their pursuit of happiness—but wait, isn’t this a little two months too late? Celebrated worldwide, the Chinese New Year is a day of rebirth and celebration for billions of people, most popularly—Asia. A holiday birthed upon a myth, the story of a raging beast named “Year” leaving its home by the sea to terrorize the surrounding villages. Upon studying its behavior, the townspeople discovered its fear of the color red, fire, and loud noises. Shielding themselves, the tradition of the Chinese New Year is born, hanging red lanterns outside of their doors, a jubilee till the early morning. Still, why do they celebrate on a separate date from the rest of the world?

Beginning between the span of the 21st of both January and February—changing every year—the second or third New Moon of the Lunar Cycle indicates the New Year. Following the Chinese Calendar, it’s lunisolar, meaning it follows the phases of the moon, explaining the change of date, compared to that of the Mayans. Before the Zhou Dynasty, they operated on a solar system, then changed due to the star chartings of an astronomer looking to improve farming conditions. Beyond these technicalities is that of each year’s assigned animal.

Separated into Yin and Yang–by number of claws and hooves–are Chinas esteemed animals cycling through each, every twelve years. Amongst these animals are the domesticated: ox, horse, goat, rooster, pig and dog, and beloved: rat, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, and monkey. The animals serve as a Chinese Zodiac, each animal having lucky and unlucky numbers, colors, flowers, and even directions (north, west, east, and south.) 2019 is the year of the pig, joining years such as 1983, 1995, and 2007. Those with this zodiac are considerate, responsible, and all around mature people. Yet on the other hoove are naïve, short-tempered, and gullible.

What is your Chinese Zodiac?